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Health Topics Videos

Welcome to the Health Topics video page. The NHLBI’s Health Topics Web site is a quick, easy, and dependable source for information about various heart, lung, and blood diseases and conditions and sleep disorders.

This site offers short videos on select topics. The videos focus on information such as the causes, risk factors, signs and symptoms, and treatments for a particular disease or condition. Experts from the NHLBI discuss how you can take action if you have or are at risk for one of these diseases or conditions.

For more information about the topics in each video, or for information about other heart, lung, blood, and sleep topics, go to http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/by-category/.


A-Z Index

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z 


A


Aplastic Anemia


Clinical Trials for Rare Blood Diseases (Neal Young, M.D.)

Clinical Trials for Rare Blood Diseases (Neal Young, M.D.)

In this video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—Dr. Neal Young talks about the importance of conducting and taking part in clinical trials. He explains the difference these studies have made in the lives of people who have rare blood and bone marrow diseases, such as aplastic anemia.


Asthma


Hard to breathe: NHLBI researchers seek treatments for severe asthma

Hard to breathe: NHLBI researchers seek treatments for severe asthma

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, is researching potential treatments for severe asthma. This video features an interview with Dr. Stewart Lavine, an NHLBI researcher, who is conducting a clinical study to test new treatment options for patients who live with severe asthma. While 25 million Americans live with asthma, about 1.25 million of those individuals have severe asthma, a condition that can be difficult to control and treat. Learn more about his research by visiting the NHLBI Laboratory of Asthma and Lung Inflammation website: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/research/intramural/researchers/pi/levine-stewart/ 

Asthma Awareness Google+ Hangout On Air

Asthma Awareness Google+ Hangout On Air

One in 11 American children has asthma -- a chronic disease that cannot be cured, but can be controlled. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), celebrated Asthma Awareness Month with a Google+ Hangout on Air for parents and caregivers to learn how to help control a child's asthma so that they can breathe easier.

Hangout panelists included Tracey Mitchell, registered respiratory therapist and certified asthma educator from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Dr. James Kiley, director of the Division of Lung Diseases at the NHLBI at the National Institutes of Health (NIH); Dr. Suzanne Beavers, a senior epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); and panel moderator Dr. Stephen Teach, chief of Allergy and Immunology and the associate chief of Emergency Medicine at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, DC. Dr. Teach is also the principal investigator and medical director of IMPACT DC (Improving Pediatric Asthma Care in the District of Columbia), an asthma research, surveillance, advocacy, and care program, and he serves as the site principal investigator for the NIH-funded Inner City Asthma Consortium for Washington.

Respirar es vida (Breath of life)

Respirar es vida (Breath of life)

Watch the video "Respirar es vida" ("Breath of Life") to learn how Jose's parents build up their asthma team. Jose, his parents, a doctor and a nurse, a promotora, a teacher, a school nurse, and a coach join forces to help Jose control his asthma. The video is recorded in Spanish and captioned in English and Spanish.

For ideas about how to use the video, use the bilingual guide How to Use A Breath of Life: Asthma Control for My Child Video with Parents and the Inhale and Exhale Worksheets.

Living With and Managing Asthma

Living With and Managing Asthma

This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—describes asthma, its signs and symptoms, and ways to manage the disease. 

Asthma is a chronic lung disease that inflames and narrows the airways, making it hard to breathe. The disease affects people of all ages, but it most often starts in childhood. People who have asthma may wheeze, cough, feel short of breath, or have chest tightness. 

Asthma can't be cured, but it can be controlled. People who have asthma, or those who have children with asthma, can take an active role in their treatment. For example, they can work with their health care providers to create an asthma action plan. This plan gives guidance on taking medicines properly, avoiding asthma triggers, tracking levels of asthma control, responding to worsening symptoms, and seeking emergency care when needed. When asthma is well controlled, most people who have the disease are able to live normal, active lives.

For more information about living with and managing asthma, go to the Health Topics Asthma article.


Atherosclerosis


What is atherosclerosis?

What is atherosclerosis?

Describes how the build-up of plaque over time causes atherosclerosis which can lead to serious problems, including heart attack, stroke, or even death. Shows how in atherosclerosis, plaque builds up inside the arteries which can cause a heart attack. Explains that the main treatment for atherosclerosis is lifestyle changes, such as following a healthy diet, quitting smoking, and being physically active.



C


Cardiac MRI


New pediatric imaging facility aims to improve treatment for congenital heart disease

New pediatric imaging facility aims to improve treatment for congenital heart disease

Members of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and Children's National Medical Center discuss the new pediatric imaging suite opening at Children's Hospital and how it may advance our ability to diagnose and treat congenital heart disease.


Clinical Trials


Children and Clinical Studies: Messages for researchers

Children and Clinical Studies: Messages for researchers

In this video, more than a dozen pediatric clinician-researchers, doctors, and nurses talk about the importance of conducting clinical trials for children and their own motivations for pursuing research in this field.

 

Learn more at http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/childrenandclinicalstudies/index.php

Children and Clinical Studies: For parents and caregivers

Children and Clinical Studies: For parents and caregivers

In this video, more than a dozen pediatric clinician-researchers, doctors, and nurses talk about the importance of conducting clinical trials for children while addressing common questions that parents and caregivers face when they are considering enrolling a child in a clinical study.

Children are not little adults, yet they are often given medicines and treatments that were only tested in adults. The way to get the best treatments for children is through research designed specifically for them.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) remains committed to ensuring that families get all the information they need to feel comfortable and make informed decisions. The safety of children is the utmost priority for all NIH research studies.

Learn more at http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/childrenandclinicalstudies/index.php


Congenital Heart Defects


New pediatric imaging facility aims to improve treatment for congenital heart disease

New pediatric imaging facility aims to improve treatment for congenital heart disease

Members of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and Children's National Medical Center discuss the new pediatric imaging suite opening at Children's Hospital and how it may advance our ability to diagnose and treat congenital heart disease.

Google+ Hangout on the first large-scale gene sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease

Google+ Hangout on the first large-scale gene sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease

This Google+ Hangout from the NHLBI features senior authors from a paper that was published online May 12, 2013, in the journal Nature, about the first large-scale sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease. This NHLBI-supported international, multicenter collaborative research effort brings us closer to understanding the most common type of birth defect.

The senior authors featured are: Dr. Bruce D. Gelb, director of the Child Health and Development Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City; Dr. Christine E. Seidman, professor of medicine and genetics and director of the Cardiovascular Genetics Center at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and a Howard Hughes investigator; and Dr. Wendy Chung, clinical and molecular geneticist and director of Clinical Genetics at Columbia University in New York City. The hangout is moderated by Dr. Jonathan R. Kaltman, chief of the Heart Development and Structural Diseases Branch in the NHLBI's Division of Cardiovascular Sciences and coauthor of the paper.

Learn more about this research and congenital heart disease here.

Researchers take step in unlocking the causes of congenital heart disease

Researchers take step in unlocking the causes of congenital heart disease

 Jonathan R. Kaltman, M.D., of the NHLBI’s Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, and Richard Lifton, M.D., Ph.D., chair of the Department of Genetics at Yale University, discuss findings from the first large-scale gene sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease. The findings, which were published online March 12, 2013, in the journal Nature, will inform future research into the causes of congenital heart disease. Read the related press release here.

Dr. Richard Lifton discusses the Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium

Dr. Richard Lifton discusses the Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium

Richard Lifton, M.D., Ph.D., chair of the Department of Genetics at Yale University, discuss the importance of the Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium, an international, multi-center collaborative research effort supported by the NHLBI. Read the related press release here.


COPD


What is COPD?

What is COPD?

Describes how COPD, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is a progressive disease that makes it hard to breathe. Details the symptoms of COPD. Shows how the disease works in the lungs. Explains how progress of the disease can be slowed.

The NHLBI

The NHLBI "Grand Opportunity" Exome Sequencing Project

This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—discusses the NHLBI's Exome Sequencing Project. Made possible by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, this project provided six awards at five academic institutions to identify genetic connections to heart, lung, and blood diseases. Individual studies will address critical health issues, such as heart attack, stroke, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, overweight and obesity, and others.

COPDGene—Research on the Role of Genetics in COPD

COPDGene—Research on the Role of Genetics in COPD

In this video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—NHLBI grantee Dr. Edwin Silverman talks about a clinical trial called COPDGene. This study is exploring whether certain genetic factors make some people who smoke more likely to develop COPD than others.

COPD, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is a lung disease that causes coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, and other symptoms. COPD is a major cause of disability and the third leading cause of death in the United States.

More than 10,000 volunteers from across the country are taking part in COPDGene. The results of this research may lead to a better understanding of COPD and improve how the disease is diagnosed and treated.


Coronary Heart Disease


All of Our Stories Are Red: Yaskary's Story

All of Our Stories Are Red: Yaskary's Story

Yaskary had lost her mother, father, and aunt to heart disease. And she knew that her life would be no exception unless she took action. At 49, she felt a mild chest pain, and hours later, underwent a quintuple bypass. Having just one risk factor increases your chance of developing heart disease, and Yaskary knows her life was spared because she understood the risk she inherited. Today she is proud to spread the word about heart disease in women. For her, the scar on her chest serves as a symbol of life.

The Heart Truth is a national campaign for women about heart disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

All of Our Stories Are Red: Eileen's Story

All of Our Stories Are Red: Eileen's Story

Eileen was a two-pack-a-day smoker for 28 years. When she suffered a heart attack, the surgeon opened her chest and found a 98 percent blockage, and her arteries disintegrated. Eileen hasn't touched a cigarette since that day. Heart disease is preventable, and every woman has the power to lower her risk factors. For Eileen, every day she spends--as a volunteer firefighter and EMT, and with her son and grandsons--is a gift.

The Heart Truth is a national campaign for women about heart disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Celebrating American Heart Month: NIH Advancing Heart Research

Celebrating American Heart Month: NIH Advancing Heart Research

More than 100 members of the NIH community gathered at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD, to raise awareness about women and heart disease. The crowd formed a giant human heart in honor of National Wear Red Day, which takes place each year on the first Friday of February. Speakers at the event included Dr. Francis Collins, director of the NIH; Dr. Gary H. Gibbons, director of the NHLBI; Dr. Griffin Rodgers, director of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Dr. Janine Clayton, director of the NIH Office of Research on Women's Health; and Dr. John Gallin, director of the NIH Clinical Center. For more information about heart disease, visit the NHLBI web site. If you share this video on Twitter, please use #NationalWearRedDay.

The NHLBI

The NHLBI "Grand Opportunity" Exome Sequencing Project

This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—discusses the NHLBI's Exome Sequencing Project. Made possible by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, this project provided six awards at five academic institutions to identify genetic connections to heart, lung, and blood diseases. Individual studies will address critical health issues, such as heart attack, stroke, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, overweight and obesity, and others.

Living With and Managing Coronary Artery Disease

Living With and Managing Coronary Artery Disease

This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—describes coronary artery disease (CAD), its symptoms and complications, and ways to manage CAD risk factors. 

CAD, also called coronary heart disease, is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States. CAD occurs if plaque builds up in the arteries of the heart. Plaque narrows the arteries and reduces blood flow to the heart muscle. This can lead to angina (chest pain or discomfort), a heart attack, heart failure, or arrhythmias (irregular heartbeats). 

The good news is that lifestyle changes and medicines can help control CAD risk factors and prevent or delay the disease. Lifestyle changes include quitting smoking, following a healthy eating plan, maintaining a healthy weight, and being physically active.

For more information about living with and managing CAD, go to the Health Topics Coronary Heart Disease article.


Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors


All of Our Stories Are Red: Yaskary's Story

All of Our Stories Are Red: Yaskary's Story

Yaskary had lost her mother, father, and aunt to heart disease. And she knew that her life would be no exception unless she took action. At 49, she felt a mild chest pain, and hours later, underwent a quintuple bypass. Having just one risk factor increases your chance of developing heart disease, and Yaskary knows her life was spared because she understood the risk she inherited. Today she is proud to spread the word about heart disease in women. For her, the scar on her chest serves as a symbol of life.

The Heart Truth is a national campaign for women about heart disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

All of Our Stories Are Red: Eileen's Story

All of Our Stories Are Red: Eileen's Story

Eileen was a two-pack-a-day smoker for 28 years. When she suffered a heart attack, the surgeon opened her chest and found a 98 percent blockage, and her arteries disintegrated. Eileen hasn't touched a cigarette since that day. Heart disease is preventable, and every woman has the power to lower her risk factors. For Eileen, every day she spends--as a volunteer firefighter and EMT, and with her son and grandsons--is a gift.

The Heart Truth is a national campaign for women about heart disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

All of Our Stories Are Red: Jennifer's Story

All of Our Stories Are Red: Jennifer's Story

Heart disease wasn't even on Jennifer's radar. And when this television news reporter suffered a heart attack at age 36, it stopped her "dead in her tracks." Jennifer reminds us how heart disease takes too many of our moms, sisters, and friends from us every day. The more we share our stories, the faster we turn the page on heart disease.

The Heart Truth is a national campaign for women about heart disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Sleep Apnea Research: The HeartBeat Study

Sleep Apnea Research: The HeartBeat Study

In this video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—Dr. Susan Redline of Harvard Medical School/Brigham and Women's Hospital discusses her ongoing sleep apnea research. Sleep apnea is a common disorder that can raise your risk for high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, arrhythmias (irregular heartbeats), heart failure, obesity, and diabetes.

One of Dr. Redline's projects, the HeartBEAT Study, is comparing treatments for sleep apnea to see whether they lower the risk of heart disease. The results of this research, which is funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, may help reduce deaths from heart attacks and strokes.

The NHLBI

The NHLBI "Grand Opportunity" Exome Sequencing Project

This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—discusses the NHLBI's Exome Sequencing Project. Made possible by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, this project provided six awards at five academic institutions to identify genetic connections to heart, lung, and blood diseases. Individual studies will address critical health issues, such as heart attack, stroke, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, overweight and obesity, and others.

Heart Disease Risk Factors

Heart Disease Risk Factors

This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—discusses the risk factors for heart disease. You can control many heart disease risk factors, but some you cannot. Taking steps to prevent heart disease is key. For example, don’t smoke or quit smoking; aim for a healthy weight; be physically active; eat for heart health; know your cholesterol, blood pressure, and blood glucose numbers; and know your family’s medical history.

For more information, visit www.hearttruth.gov or the Health Topics Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors and Heart Disease in Women articles.


Coronary Microvascular Disease


Celebrating American Heart Month: NIH Advancing Heart Research

Celebrating American Heart Month: NIH Advancing Heart Research

More than 100 members of the NIH community gathered at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD, to raise awareness about women and heart disease. The crowd formed a giant human heart in honor of National Wear Red Day, which takes place each year on the first Friday of February. Speakers at the event included Dr. Francis Collins, director of the NIH; Dr. Gary H. Gibbons, director of the NHLBI; Dr. Griffin Rodgers, director of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Dr. Janine Clayton, director of the NIH Office of Research on Women's Health; and Dr. John Gallin, director of the NIH Clinical Center. For more information about heart disease, visit the NHLBI web site. If you share this video on Twitter, please use #NationalWearRedDay.



H


Heart Attack


What is a heart attack?

What is a heart attack?

Describes how a heart attack happens and that most heart attacks occur as a result of coronary heart disease. Shows what happens inside the heart during a heart attack. Describes symptoms of a heart attack and tells you what to do if symptoms occur.

All of Our Stories Are Red: Jennifer's Story

All of Our Stories Are Red: Jennifer's Story

Heart disease wasn't even on Jennifer's radar. And when this television news reporter suffered a heart attack at age 36, it stopped her "dead in her tracks." Jennifer reminds us how heart disease takes too many of our moms, sisters, and friends from us every day. The more we share our stories, the faster we turn the page on heart disease.

The Heart Truth is a national campaign for women about heart disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The NHLBI

The NHLBI "Grand Opportunity" Exome Sequencing Project

This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—discusses the NHLBI's Exome Sequencing Project. Made possible by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, this project provided six awards at five academic institutions to identify genetic connections to heart, lung, and blood diseases. Individual studies will address critical health issues, such as heart attack, stroke, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, overweight and obesity, and others.

Heart Attack Warning Symptoms

Heart Attack Warning Symptoms

This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—discusses the warning symptoms of a heart attack. It presents one woman's real-life experience with heart attack symptoms, which started during her pregnancy. The video also explains how a heart attack occurs and encourages women to seek care right away for heart attack symptoms.

For more information, visit www.hearttruth.gov or the Health Topics Heart Attack and Heart Disease in Women articles.


Heart Disease in Women


All of Our Stories Are Red: Yaskary's Story

All of Our Stories Are Red: Yaskary's Story

Yaskary had lost her mother, father, and aunt to heart disease. And she knew that her life would be no exception unless she took action. At 49, she felt a mild chest pain, and hours later, underwent a quintuple bypass. Having just one risk factor increases your chance of developing heart disease, and Yaskary knows her life was spared because she understood the risk she inherited. Today she is proud to spread the word about heart disease in women. For her, the scar on her chest serves as a symbol of life.

The Heart Truth is a national campaign for women about heart disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

All of Our Stories Are Red: Eileen's Story

All of Our Stories Are Red: Eileen's Story

Eileen was a two-pack-a-day smoker for 28 years. When she suffered a heart attack, the surgeon opened her chest and found a 98 percent blockage, and her arteries disintegrated. Eileen hasn't touched a cigarette since that day. Heart disease is preventable, and every woman has the power to lower her risk factors. For Eileen, every day she spends--as a volunteer firefighter and EMT, and with her son and grandsons--is a gift.

The Heart Truth is a national campaign for women about heart disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Celebrating American Heart Month: NIH Advancing Heart Research

Celebrating American Heart Month: NIH Advancing Heart Research

More than 100 members of the NIH community gathered at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD, to raise awareness about women and heart disease. The crowd formed a giant human heart in honor of National Wear Red Day, which takes place each year on the first Friday of February. Speakers at the event included Dr. Francis Collins, director of the NIH; Dr. Gary H. Gibbons, director of the NHLBI; Dr. Griffin Rodgers, director of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Dr. Janine Clayton, director of the NIH Office of Research on Women's Health; and Dr. John Gallin, director of the NIH Clinical Center. For more information about heart disease, visit the NHLBI web site. If you share this video on Twitter, please use #NationalWearRedDay.

All of Our Stories Are Red: Jennifer's Story

All of Our Stories Are Red: Jennifer's Story

Heart disease wasn't even on Jennifer's radar. And when this television news reporter suffered a heart attack at age 36, it stopped her "dead in her tracks." Jennifer reminds us how heart disease takes too many of our moms, sisters, and friends from us every day. The more we share our stories, the faster we turn the page on heart disease.

The Heart Truth is a national campaign for women about heart disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Red Dress Collection 2013 highlights

Red Dress Collection 2013 highlights

On February 6, 2013, The Heart Truth celebrated its 11th annual Red Dress Collection at New York Fashion Week, featuring 17 custom-made designs worn by 16 celebrities and heart disease survivor Cindy Parsons. The Heart Truth is a national campaign for women about heart disease and is sponsored by the NHLBI. The American College of Cardiology joined the NHLBI to help spread The Heart Truth message through its support of the Red Dress Collection 2013 Fashion Show.

The Heart Truth®

The Heart Truth®

This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—showcases The Heart Truth® campaign. The campaign raises awareness among women of their risk for heart disease and inspires them to take action against the disease. 

Through community events and local programs, the campaign encourages women to know their risks and make heart healthy choices. The centerpiece of The Heart Truth campaign is the Red Dress®—a national symbol for women and heart disease awareness. 

For more information, visit www.hearttruth.gov or the Health Topics Heart Disease in Women article. 

 ® The Heart Truth and the Red Dress are registered trademarks of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Heart Attack Warning Symptoms

Heart Attack Warning Symptoms

This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—discusses the warning symptoms of a heart attack. It presents one woman's real-life experience with heart attack symptoms, which started during her pregnancy. The video also explains how a heart attack occurs and encourages women to seek care right away for heart attack symptoms.

For more information, visit www.hearttruth.gov or the Health Topics Heart Attack and Heart Disease in Women articles.

Heart Disease Risk Factors

Heart Disease Risk Factors

This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—discusses the risk factors for heart disease. You can control many heart disease risk factors, but some you cannot. Taking steps to prevent heart disease is key. For example, don’t smoke or quit smoking; aim for a healthy weight; be physically active; eat for heart health; know your cholesterol, blood pressure, and blood glucose numbers; and know your family’s medical history.

For more information, visit www.hearttruth.gov or the Health Topics Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors and Heart Disease in Women articles.


High Blood Cholesterol


The NHLBI

The NHLBI "Grand Opportunity" Exome Sequencing Project

This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—discusses the NHLBI's Exome Sequencing Project. Made possible by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, this project provided six awards at five academic institutions to identify genetic connections to heart, lung, and blood diseases. Individual studies will address critical health issues, such as heart attack, stroke, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, overweight and obesity, and others.


High Blood Pressure


Myth-busting blood pressure - a hypertension Google+ hangout in honor of World Hypertension Day

Myth-busting blood pressure - a hypertension Google+ hangout in honor of World Hypertension Day

Moderated by American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown, this "Google+ Hangout on Air" features a panel of experts from the American Heart Association as well as nutritionist Janet M. de Jesus from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The panelists discuss common myths and misconceptions about hypertension (high blood pressure) and what you can do to prevent or treat the "silent killer." The chat was streamed live on April 5, 2013 in honor of World Health Day on Sunday, April 7.

The NHLBI

The NHLBI "Grand Opportunity" Exome Sequencing Project

This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—discusses the NHLBI's Exome Sequencing Project. Made possible by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, this project provided six awards at five academic institutions to identify genetic connections to heart, lung, and blood diseases. Individual studies will address critical health issues, such as heart attack, stroke, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, overweight and obesity, and others.

Managing High Blood Pressure With Lifestyle Changes

Managing High Blood Pressure With Lifestyle Changes

This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—shows how Kendra, the mother of a teenaged daughter, has learned to manage her high blood pressure. Before being diagnosed with high blood pressure, Kendra suffered from chronic headaches and tiredness. At a health fair sponsored by her company, Kendra learned that her blood pressure was high, which prompted her to see her doctor. 

After being diagnosed with high blood pressure, Kendra made a commitment to living a healthier lifestyle. By following a healthy diet and being physically active, she lost almost 60 pounds. With the support of her girlfriend and daughter, Kendra has maintained her weight loss and continues to make lifestyle changes that allow her to live an active, happy life. 

For more information about managing high blood pressure with lifestyle changes, go to the Health Topics High Blood Pressure article.



I


Iron-Deficiency Anemia


Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia

Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia

This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—shows how Susan, a full-time worker and student, has coped with having iron-deficiency anemia. Prior to her diagnosis, Susan had symptoms such as tiredness, poor skin tone, dizziness, and depression. 

After her doctor diagnosed her with iron-deficiency anemia, Susan got counseling on how to improve her health and well-being. She began taking iron supplements and multivitamins to improve her iron levels. Susan also made changes to her diet, such as focusing more on green leafy vegetables, red meats, nuts, dried fruits, and beans. Other lifestyle changes, such as getting enough sleep and exercising, also have helped Susan feel better. 

To further improve her condition, Susan had a minor surgical procedure to stop her monthly periods. By following her treatment plan and making smart lifestyle choices, Susan continues to feel better and see the benefits of treatment.

For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, go to the Health Topics Iron-Deficiency Anemia article.



N


Narcolepsy


Dr. Emmanuel Mignot talks about advances in narcolepsy research and care

Dr. Emmanuel Mignot talks about advances in narcolepsy research and care

Dr. Michael Twery, director of the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research in the NHLBI's Division of Lung Diseases, interviews Dr. Emmanuel Mignot, director of the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine and the Stanford Center for Narcolepsy, about advances in narcolepsy research.

An NHLBI grantee, Dr. Mignot is credited with discovering the cause of narcolepsy—a disorder that causes periods of extreme daytime sleepiness. There is no known cure, but the NHLBI is committed to supporting research to better understand, treat, and even prevent or cure narcolepsy as well as other heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders. 



O


Overweight and Obesity


Obesity happens one pound at a time. So does prevention.

Obesity happens one pound at a time. So does prevention.

This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—shows that even a few extra pounds can affect your health and life more than you may think. Average people in a park—not actors—are asked to carry a 10-pound sandbag, and report how the added weight affects them and their ability to carry out normal, everyday activities.



S


Sarcoidosis


Living With and Managing Sarcoidosis

Living With and Managing Sarcoidosis

This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—shows how Romaine, an executive and wife, has coped with having sarcoidosis. Although she had no symptoms, Romaine learned she had sarcoidosis of the lung as the result of testing done for another reason. 

Prior to being diagnosed with sarcoidosis, Romaine had never heard of the disease. Within about 5 years of her diagnosis, she began having symptoms. Her symptoms started with a dry cough, which became chronic about a year after it first developed. 

Unable to speak a sentence without coughing, Romaine began taking medicine to treat her sarcoidosis. Also, she began to focus on following a healthy lifestyle, including eating well and being physically active. By following her treatment plan and making lifestyle changes, Romaine is able to live a full, active life.

For more information about living with and managing sarcoidosis, go to the Health Topics Sarcoidosis article.


Sickle Cell Anemia


Living With and Managing Sickle Cell Disease (Nicholas)

Living With and Managing Sickle Cell Disease (Nicholas)

In this video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—Nicholas and his mother, Bridget, talk about life with sickle cell disease. Nicholas was diagnosed with sickle cell disease soon after he was born. He suffered from hand-foot syndrome as a baby and had his gallbladder and spleen removed at age 5. 

Penicillin, hydroxyurea, and other medicines have helped Nicholas and his family manage the illness and the severe pain crises that can result in hospital stays. Now a teenager, Nicholas enjoys going to school, taking part in sports, and hanging out with friends.

For more information about living with and managing sickle cell disease, go to the Health Topics Sickle Cell Anemia article.

Living With and Managing Sickle Cell Disease (Tiffany)

Living With and Managing Sickle Cell Disease (Tiffany)

This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—shows how Tiffany, a mother and student, has coped with having sickle cell disease. Born with the most severe form of sickle cell disease, sickle cell anemia, Tiffany has lived with the symptoms and complications of this disease her entire life. 

After giving birth to her daughter, Tiffany became very sick and was admitted to the hospital many times. In 2009, she began treatment with a medicine called hydroxyurea. Although Tiffany's brother had taken hydroxyurea and had many side effects, Tiffany has had success with the treatment. Her commitment to following her treatment plan and living a healthy lifestyle have helped her manage sickle cell anemia and live a happy, full life.

For more information about living with and managing sickle cell disease, go to the Health Topics Sickle Cell Anemia article.


Sleep Apnea


Sleep Apnea Research: The HeartBeat Study

Sleep Apnea Research: The HeartBeat Study

In this video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—Dr. Susan Redline of Harvard Medical School/Brigham and Women's Hospital discusses her ongoing sleep apnea research. Sleep apnea is a common disorder that can raise your risk for high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, arrhythmias (irregular heartbeats), heart failure, obesity, and diabetes.

One of Dr. Redline's projects, the HeartBEAT Study, is comparing treatments for sleep apnea to see whether they lower the risk of heart disease. The results of this research, which is funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, may help reduce deaths from heart attacks and strokes.

Living With and Managing Sleep Apnea

Living With and Managing Sleep Apnea

This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—shows how Jim, the father of two young girls, has coped with having sleep apnea. Symptoms such as waking up tired and falling asleep while driving long distances made Jim concerned about his health. While Jim was sleeping, his wife noticed snoring and long periods of silence followed by gasps. 

Wanting a better quality of life, Jim sought the advice of his doctor, who recommended a sleep study. As a result of the sleep study, Jim was diagnosed with severe obstructive sleep apnea and prescribed treatment with a CPAP machine. CPAP provides mild air pressure to keep the airways open during sleep. 

Jim explains that adjusting to CPAP treatment was hard at first, and his inability to stick with the treatment led to more symptoms. However, after using the CPAP machine regularly, Jim feels better and has more energy to do activities with his children.

For more information about living with and managing sleep apnea, go to the Health Topics Sleep Apnea article.


Smoking and Your Heart


All of Our Stories Are Red: Eileen's Story

All of Our Stories Are Red: Eileen's Story

Eileen was a two-pack-a-day smoker for 28 years. When she suffered a heart attack, the surgeon opened her chest and found a 98 percent blockage, and her arteries disintegrated. Eileen hasn't touched a cigarette since that day. Heart disease is preventable, and every woman has the power to lower her risk factors. For Eileen, every day she spends--as a volunteer firefighter and EMT, and with her son and grandsons--is a gift.

The Heart Truth is a national campaign for women about heart disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The NHLBI

The NHLBI "Grand Opportunity" Exome Sequencing Project

This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—discusses the NHLBI's Exome Sequencing Project. Made possible by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, this project provided six awards at five academic institutions to identify genetic connections to heart, lung, and blood diseases. Individual studies will address critical health issues, such as heart attack, stroke, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, overweight and obesity, and others.


Stents


How are stents placed?

How are stents placed?

Describes what a sent is and how it is used as part of a procedure called percutaneous coronary intervention or PCI, sometimes called angioplasty. Shows how a stent is placed in the heart and how a stent functions.


Last Updated: August 28, 2014